Board of Trustees

The Rangeview Library District is governed by a five-member Board of Trustees, appointed by the Adams County Board of Commissioners, and is responsible for the library district's finances and formulation of policies. Trustees serve a five-year term. The library board meets regularly once per month. Click here to view the schedule.

Board of Trustees

Ray Coffey

Photo of Ray Coffey

(303) 433-4661 (H)
ray_coffey@comcast.net
Unincorporated Adams County
Term expires: Jan. 31, 2017

Ray Coffey has worked for the state of Colorado since 1985 as an auditor, accountant and budget analyst. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Colorado State University in technical journalism and studied business and accounting at Metro State College of Denver. He passed the Certified Public Accounting exam in 1987. Earlier in life he was a professional and volunteer ski patroller. He also owned and operated a painting and decorating business.

Ray believes free access to information is a cornerstone of democracy. He also believes libraries and the services they provide can be transformational forces in people’s lives and are an essential component of a community’s infrastructure. As a Board of Trustee, his goal is to help provide great libraries and library services relevant to the 21st century that will enhance the quality of life for all the residents of the library district.

Mizraim Cordero

Mizraim Cordero

(917) 741-0307 (H)
airmiz@aol.com
Commerce City
Term expires: Feb. 11, 2016

Mizraim S. Cordero migrated with his parents to New York City in June of 1989 from Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Mizraim obtained his bachelor’s degree from Lehman College of the City University of New York with a concentration in social work and a minor in sociology. In May 1999, he graduated from NYU’s School of Social Work with a master’s degree in clinical social work as an advanced standing student. 

He began his counseling career at Catholic Charities Behavioral Health Services of the Archdiocese of New York in their Washington Heights/Inwood Clinic while he continued his graduate studies. In his role as clinician, Mizraim developed his skills in working with community partners to meet the needs of young children and families in New York City. After six years of service, he was hired as the social services director at the Kingsbridge Heights Community Center (KHCC) Early Childhood Division in the Bronx, N.Y. In 2005, Mizraim graduated from the Columbia University Executive Business School’s Not-for-profit Management Program. A year later he was promoted to department director for Early Childhood at KHCC.

In February 2008, Mizraim relocated his family to Colorado. He was administrator of Adams County Head Start under the Community & Economic Opportunity Department. Beginning January 2010, Mizraim began serving as the Intergovernmental Relations manager for the City of Commerce City.  There he provides leadership and vision to Commerce City by developing, administering, reviewing and monitoring community relations procedures and programs; coordinating federal and state legislative issues and supervising the efforts to secure alternative funding through grants.

Kerry L. Glenn


(720) 346-3927 (H)

kerry.glenn@adams12.org

Northglenn

Term expires: Dec. 11, 2017

A lifelong resident of Adams County, Colorado, Kerry L. Glenn works for the same school district he attended as a student. After 23 years as a math instructor, Kerry now serves as the STEM Coordinator at Northglenn High School. He is a liaison between district, school, partners and community, and also designs and reviews curriculum and support for problem-based learning. 

Kerry received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder in applied mathematics and aerospace engineering before earning a master’s degree in curriculum and pedagogy from the University of Colorado At Denver. In addition to a career as a mathematics educator and STEM educator, Kerry also served as a youth pastor for 20 years.

Kerry believes that access to information can help fuel passion and direction. For him, libraries aren’t just about checking out books. They’re also about gaining and applying the information to help solve the world’s challenges.

Dot Lindsey

Photo of Dorothy Lindsey

(303) 659-4540 (H)
djlindseygol4@aol.com
Brighton
Term expires: February 11, 2015

Dot Lindsey retired in 2001 after teaching for 30 years in the Brighton schools, where she taught mathematics to junior high and high school students.

She is a licensed fly fisher, sanctioned bowler, registered voter, amateur golfer, advanced beginner pianist, and an ordained deacon and elder in the Presbyterian Church. She is also an avid reader. Dot was appointed to the Rangeview Library District Board of Trustees in 2004 for a one-year term, and was reappointed to a five-year term in 2005. Dot was the co-chair of the successful mill levy campaign in 2006.

"I am forever grateful to the voters in our library district for their approval of an increased mill levy to provide the necessary funds to bring our libraries into the 21st century. All of us on the Board of Trustees take very seriously our responsibility to oversee the expenditures of those funds. I believe that the voters will be very pleased with the new libraries that are being built and the refurbishing of several of our current libraries. Our great library staff, and the services they provide, will continue to be what makes our libraries among the best."

Being a volunteer member of the Rangeview Library District Board of Trustees provides an opportunity to put Dot's beliefs into action. She believes that libraries are truly unique places. "I believe that libraries are as important as the air we breathe and the water we drink. They do more than inform people; they transform them. Libraries represent all the best qualities that define a free and democratic society. They support the common beliefs of borrowing and returning, respect, courtesy, and equality. Libraries are also a critical part of any community or neighborhood infrastructure. They are equally as important as police and fire departments, and schools. Funding for libraries should be considered a priority, not a luxury."

Linda Wisniewski

Photo of Linda Wisniewski

(303) 452-6920 (H)
lggwiskey@aol.com
Thornton
Term expires: January 31, 2019

Linda Wisniewski began her term with the RLD Board in March 2009. She has a business degree with a project management concentration and currently works for the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment.

She is on the executive board of the Thornton Veterans Memorial Foundation, which is building a Veteran's Memorial Park in Thornton. Linda is also on the missions committee at Good Shepherd United Methodist Church, which targets community projects for involvement with the church. Previously, she was also on the executive board of Northern Lights Little League, who built a seven-field ballpark.

Married for 31 years, Linda has three children. Her daughter lives in Savannah, Georgia, with her husband and Linda's grandson. Her first granddaughter is due in July. Linda's oldest son is an Iraq War veteran, who successfully completed two tours in Iraq and is now studying to be a firefighter. Her youngest son is a computer programmer and a musician.

"I have always felt that Adams County libraries lacked a certain direction, and I have watched with great interest the growth of the Rangeview Library District. I feel the positive direction the district has taken is wonderful," Linda says. She looks forward to contributing to help it grow.

"To me, libraries bring the world to its patrons," says Linda. "It starts children in their discovery and wonder of the earth around them and of reading. It allows all people the access to knowledge and the wonders of the world. It is hard to think of a community without a connection to a library."