Due to inclement weather, Anythink Bennett is closed Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019.

A quarterly publication from Anythink Libraries Archive • Subscribe Digital edition • View magazine edition

Dogs with jobs

Dogs aren’t just our canine companions; they can also help us live better lives. Here are some local dogs with jobs helping humans.

Parker the Snow Dog

Parker is the official snow dog for the Loveland Ski Area, and can be found keeping a close eye on skiers and snowboarders on the slopes. (Photo courtesy of Dustin Schaefer.)

The DEN CATS

Flying can make anyone anxious or stressed. That’s where dogs – or in this case, CATS (Canine Airport Therapy Squad) – come in. At Denver International Airport, more than 100 dogs (and one cat) walk through the terminals wearing vests that say “Pet me.” CATS is the largest airport therapy animal program in the country. (Photo courtesy of Denver International Airport.)

Riley the Reading Dog

Riley is just one of the dogs that joins young readers as part of a regular series hosted at several Anythink locations. Reading to a therapy dog is a great way for kids to practice – these patient volunteers love to listen and never criticize. Riley is handled by Mary Ann O’Meara and provided by Therapy Dogs of Boulder County. Check with your local Anythink to learn more about upcoming animal reading sessions.

Mitzi the Hearing Dog

Mitzi was trained as a service dog right here in Adams County by International Hearing Dog Inc., an organization that provides shelter dogs to help people who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. Mitzi now lives in Oregon, where she can help alert her owner to all types of noises like telephone rings, door knocks, doorbells, alarm clocks, smoke alarms or a baby’s cry. Learn more about International Hearing Dog, Inc. (Photo courtesy of International Hearing Dog, Inc.)

Mikey the Patrol Dog

Mikey is one of the latest additions to the Adams County Sheriff’s K9 unit. He spends his time helping local police officers with various patrolling services – and he puts his incredible sense of smell to use helping detect narcotics. (Photo courtesy Adams County Sheriff.) ■

Send your questions or feedback to ithink@anythinklibraries.org or post in the comments below.