Tag: review

I was slightly intrigued by The Stranger in the Woods when I sat in on Anythink Commerce City's book club discussion on this non-fiction title by Michael Finkel. I had already put this book on my Goodreads "To Read" list, but had forgotten about it. After listening to the discussion on this story, I knew I had to read it.

I have quite a soft spot for the elderly. Possibly it's because I had the pleasure of growing up with regular contact with both sets of my grandparents (who were amazing people). I also think it's because I was taught to see the value in those in the older generation. They have lived through circumstances that I may never understand, but I can truly appreciate what their experiences can bring to my life and to this world. I still have one grandparent alive. She is one of the sweetest people you'll ever meet and full of so many talents – she's an artist who at 93 still paints regularly. She

In most bottle stories, the characters are trapped. Nicole and I examined two such stories in our previous posts in this series. But there is another kind of bottle story. Rather than confining characters somewhere against their will and watching what happens, this other kind of bottle story simply tells a complete narrative with only one setting. The story could go to other places, but it doesn’t need to. This is perhaps the purest form of bottle storytelling.

The Daily Show (The Book) is a compelling read. It presents the workings of a unique program in a style well-suited to the subject. This book shows the show during Jon Stewart’s tenure, yet it isn’t comprised of a host of comments by the host. Rather, author Chris Smith collects comments from a wide range of the show’s staff, and also from some guests and critics.

“The day after I was born my parents named me Resolute. Pa said it gave me an aspect of solemnity and perseverance, which are pretty things for a child with a sanguine humor. It was a good name for a girl, Ma always added, and there was nothing wrong with a girl being confident and ruddy. A boy could grow to 'make a name for himself,' but a girl needed a special one from birth.” 

Anythink recently added a new book to its collection titled My Ideal Bookshelf by Thessaly LaForce and Jane Mount. When I first saw this book on the New and Notable shelf, I snatched it up quick! I LOVE books about books! It's not enough that I have stacks and stacks of unread books at home or a wish list of to-read books a mile long - I simply cannot resist books about books.