Tag: recommendations

mother snuggles up to her baby in bed

When someone becomes a new parent, they are often overwhelmed with advice from family, friends and strangers in grocery store check-out lanes. Since giving birth three years ago, my own parenting style has faced many questions and earnest concerns. My grandmother still does not understand why my female child loves cars.

The last time I searched for “classic movies” in Netflix I got less than 40 results, and many of the available titles weren’t exactly what I’d consider cinematic masterpieces.The outcome was hardly better when I searched for foreign films. And while Netflix has a decent selection of documentaries, the majority of the offerings are Netflix productions. I say all this not to disparage Netflix but to point out that, although streaming films and TV shows has never been easier, Netflix and the other major streaming platforms are by no means comprehensive in their selections. 

Blue colors the pages of four new picture books in compelling and beautiful ways. In these stories and illustrations, blue is the color of sky and moon, day and night. Notably, it is not really a color associated with sadness here, but rather, one used to express something joyful. Borrowing blue from these pages, readers can explore anew this vivid and varied color.

June Carter was tuning her guitar backstage, and singing "a-ummm" to warm up her vocal chords. She did so based on a recommendation from her friend Elvis Presley, who had been touring with her for several weeks. Elvis was enchanted by the musical stylings of Johnny Cash, and had taught June to warm up her voice using a technique he’d learned from the yet undiscovered singer-songwriter from Arkansas.

Storytelling invites understanding. In particular, a real-life narrative, such as a memoir, asks for attention and comprehension. Recently, I enjoyed reading three disparate memoirs, appreciating their interesting information and separate points of view. Tig Notaro, Juan Thompson and Pat Summitt each tell different stories with distinct voices in memoirs published not long ago, and all three volumes are worth reading.

When it was announced last fall that Gilmore Girls would be returning via Netflix, with four new 90-minute episodes, the jubilation was resounding – pretty impressive for a show that ended nearly a decade ago, and was notoriously snubbed repeatedly for Emmy nominations (as most WB/CW programs were wont to be).

When two cinephiles realize they’re in the company of a fellow addict, it’s hard to shut them up. They compare favorite movies, quote lines of dialogue, reenact scenes. And then the moment invariably comes when one is forced to admit having not seen a particular movie; he’s been meaning to, he just...never got around to it. And if he’s lucky, the other cinephile will receive this information with excitement rather than derision, saying, “Oh you’ve got to see it, you’re going to love it!”

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